Assessment Roundtable

Fall 2017

 

Writing and evaluating student learning outcomes versus program objectives

Wednesday, September 27, 2017 - 2:00pm
Perkins 217
  • Participants will be able to articulate the difference between a Student Learning Outcome and a Program Objective
  • Participants will be able to identify and articulate their program specific Program Objectives; ideally reflecting and complementing the program’s mission and associated student learning outcomes.
  • Participants will identify and/or update the measures necessary to collect this information.
  • Participants will be able to set reasonable targets and know how to evaluate them.
  • Participants will identify a time/structure for reporting this work to garner feedback from faculty colleagues.
  • Participants will be able to use the new “program objectives” feature in the Department Assessment Portfolio

Resources: Recorded PresentationPresentation Slides - Handout 1 -  Handout 2

Wednesday, October 11, 2017 - 1:00pm
Rubenstein 349 (Breedlove)
  • Participants will understand difference between Holistic and Analytic rubrics.
  • Participants will understand the relationship between course-level and program-level rubrics.
  • Participants will describe viable use cases for program-level portfolios.
  • Participants will begin the process of developing a rubric for the assessment of program-level student learning outcomes.
  • Participants will understand the importance of rater calibration, and be able to apply basic techniques to promote validity and reliability of rubric-based data.
  • Participants will report this work back to faculty colleagues in the near future.

Resource:  Presentation slides

Monday, October 16, 2017 - 1:00pm
1:00 – 2:00 pm in Rubenstein 349 (Breedlove)
  • Assessment liaisons are required to submit the 2017-18 department assessment portfolio by June 1, 2018. 
  • Participants will learn about new functions in the portfolio.
  • Participants will understand how to migrate work from the 2016-17 cycle to the present academic year.

Resource:  Presentation slides

Tuesday, October 24, 2017 - 10:00am
Perkins 217
  • Report examples include COFHE enrolled student and senior surveys, Tableau program informational reports, course evaluations.
  • Participants will identify and report the types of data they’re already collecting.
  • Participants will be become familiar with other types/sources of data (course, program and college wide) they already have access to.
  • Participants will brainstorm the ways in which these data sources support the program’s student learning outcomes.

​Resources:  Recorded Presentation - Presentation slides

Thursday, October 26, 2017 - 12:30pm and Wednesday, November 1, 2017 - 9:00am
Bevan 1001 (parking passes provided)
  • Participants will be able to access interactive reports containing information about undergraduate student learning in their programs. 
  • Participants will understand the general types of data available and how they may be used to supplement ongoing evaluations of student learning.
  • Data include measures of ethical reasoning, global perspectives, critical thinking, reflective judgment, and starting in 2015 quantitative reasoning and literacy
  • The dashboards also include information about the composition of your student population, any relevant pre-matriculation inputs (e.g., SAT scores), co-incidental majors and minors, outcomes at graduation, and other attributes. 
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 - 9:00am
Rubenstein 249 (Carpenter)
  • Assessment liaisons are required to submit the 2017-18 department assessment portfolio by June 1, 2018. 
  • Participants will learn about new functions in the portfolio.
  • Participants will understand how to migrate work from the 2016-17 cycle to the present academic year.
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 - 1:00pm
Perkins 217
  • Participants will understand the difference between quantitative and qualitative data.
  • Participants will know how to align assessment measures with the types of data they wish to collect.
  • Participants will be able to identify commonly-used and easily-accessed tools, usually free, for making sense of quantitative and qualitative data. 
  • Participants will be able to judge which techniques to use when analyzing data.

Resource: Presentation Slides